Unna Boot Dressings - Flex Wraps, Bandages, and Modified Unnas

Unna boot is a type of specialty gauze often used to treat conditions, such as venous stasis ulcers or lymphedema. However, unna wraps can also be used as supportive bandages. Allegromedical.com proudly offers a wide selection of unna boot wraps and flexible bandaging in varying sizes from industry leaders like AliMed, McKesson, Unna-Flex, Western Medical, and Dynarex. Shop confidently with our Best Price Guarantee.

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17 Items

Set Descending Direction
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  1. McKesson Unna Boot White with Calamine 3-inch X 10 yds. - Box of 1 McKesson Unna Boot White with Calamine 3-inch X 10 yds. - Box of 1
    $4.42
  2. McKesson Unna Boot McKesson Unna Boot
    $5.04 - $72.71
  3. Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing w/ Calamine - 4 x 10 yds Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing w/ Calamine - 4 x 10 yds
    $5.86 - $9.08
    Rating:
    100%
    2  Reviews
  4. Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing w/ Calamine - 4 x 10 yds - Case of 12 Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing w/ Calamine - 4 x 10 yds - Case of 12
    $70.86
    Rating:
    100%
    1  Review
  5. Unna Boot Bandage - Econo-Paste Unna Boot Dressing Unna Boot Bandage - Econo-Paste Unna Boot Dressing
    $5.58 - $81.03
    Rating:
    100%
    1  Review
  6. Unna Boot Bandage Unna Boot Bandage
    $8.15 - $117.73
  7. Unna's Boot Dressing (Generic) Bandage - 10 yds/rl, 12 rl/cs Unna's Boot Dressing (Generic) Bandage - 10 yds/rl, 12 rl/cs
    $140.16 - $175.90
    Rating:
    100%
    1  Review
  8. Gelocast Unna's Boot Dressing Gelocast Unna's Boot Dressing
    $11.59 - $13.42
    Rating:
    100%
    6  Reviews
  9. UNNA-FLEX Elastic Unna Boot - 4" wide UNNA-FLEX Elastic Unna Boot - 4" wide
    $18.94 - $206.30
  10. Gelocast Unna's Boot Dressing - 4 Gelocast Unna's Boot Dressing - 4" x 10 Yd - Case of 12
    $130.61
  11. UNNA-FLEX plus Venous Ulcer Kit - 4" x 10 Yd - Each UNNA-FLEX plus Venous Ulcer Kit - 4" x 10 Yd - Each
    $26.88
  12. Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing - 4 x 10 yds - Case of 12 Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing - 4 x 10 yds - Case of 12
    $73.44
    Rating:
    60%
    2  Reviews
  13. Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing w/ Calamine - 3 x 10 yds - Each Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing w/ Calamine - 3 x 10 yds - Each
    $9.08
  14. Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing - 3 x 10 yds - Case of 12 Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing - 3 x 10 yds - Case of 12
    $99.80
  15. Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing - 4 x 10 yds - Each Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing - 4 x 10 yds - Each
    $5.93
  16. Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing - 3 x 10 yds Primer Modified Unna Boot Dressing - 3 x 10 yds
    $5.93 - $9.39
    Rating:
    100%
    2  Reviews
  17. Curity Unna Boot Bandage Curity Unna Boot Bandage
    $9.89
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Unna Boot

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


What is an Unna boot?

An Unna boot is a medicinal wrap designed to help increase circulation and decrease painful swelling in the lower leg. The Unna boot compression dressing is a layered series of cotton and gauze strips wrapped around your lower leg, ankle, and foot. Generally held in place with an ACE bandage, the Unna flex-wrap boot has a cotton layer that contains a mixture of zinc oxide paste and calamine. These two additives aid wound healing by reducing skin irritations and retaining moisture in the wound area. In addition, this mixture works better than other gelatins because it doesn't get cakey.

How do I apply an Unna boot?

A health care provider is responsible for the proper application of your Unna Boot wrap. However, you need to know how to wrap an Unna boot in case of an emergency. To begin, you must reduce the swelling by elevating your leg over your heart for roughly 20 minutes. Next, the wrapping technique will start at your toes' base and end at knee level. Next, your health care provider will begin wrapping your wound with a layer of gauze laced with petroleum jelly.

The next layer of gauze will contain lotions and medicines for promoting wound healing, followed by two layers of dry gauze. At this point, your health care provider will end the procedure by securing the wrapping with an elastic bandage. Soon after, your Unna boot will dry to develop into a semi-rigid mold against the skin.

How long can an Unna boot stay on?

You can expect to have your Unna boot bandage changed about every seven days. The total amount of time depends on your health conditions and the healing rate of your wound. Health conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure can slow down the healing process. So, these conditions must remain under control during the healing time.

During each dressing change, your health care provider will clean the wound area and measure the wound area to monitor the healing process. In addition, it helps the healing process to take a daily walk. Plus, you can aid faster healing by keeping a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, low-fat dairy products, beans, whole-grain bread, and lean meats.

What do you use an Unna boot for?

The Unna boot has a variety of uses for the treatment of leg problems. Aside from using Unna boots for lymphoedema, it's the primary dressing for venous stasis ulcers, open wounds, and lesions. However, there are Unna boot indications for other leg problems that require compressions, such as ankle sprains and strains. Health care providers use the Unna boot to promote healing of the leg area by encouraging blood flow, keeping the site moist, and protecting the wound. For the most part, Unna wrap boots are more suited for active patients who can walk around independently. The Unna boot's contraindications apply to patients who use wheelchairs and patients with dry wounds.

Can you walk with an Unna boot?

You can walk while wearing an Unna boot dressing. It's one of the best things you can do because walking causes the pressure from the Unna boot bandages to assist your calves in pumping blood through the leg region. Just don't overdo it, and if you sweat profusely, take measures to keep the Unna flexible boot dry.

Is an Unna boot painful?

It is possible to feel pain from wearing the Unna boot, especially if it is too tight, loose, or damaged. These conditions can cause hard edges and irregular contact that irritate the wound site's skin. Also, the drawing effect of the Unna boot can cause discomfort or pain. Unfortunate pain often is part of the healing process. However, if you have any concerns about excessive pain, contact your health care provider immediately.

How do I remove an Unna boot?

You will need to remove your Unna boot when the wrap gets wet, you experience severe pain, the discharge smells strange, or your legs get itchy and warm. Also, you should remove the Unna boot if you experience any other Unna boot side effects like numb feet, cold toes, or excessive drainage.

If your doctor advises you to remove your Unna boot, take a pair of bandage scissors and cut the elastic wrap from the knee to the toe. Make sure that the scissors have room to cut under the layer by pulling the elastic wrapping away from the leg. After you have exposed the cotton middle section of the Unna boot, tear it out with your hands. Removing these layers will expose a fabric dressing laced with calamine and zinc oxide. Starting at the top, carefully unwrap the inner layer of Unna boot wound care dressing, and finish by cleaning the wound area with soap and water. When you finish, cover the wound with a 4x4 gauze pad and light wrap-around dressing.


MEDICAL ADVICE DISCLAIMER
The information, including but not limited to text, graphics, images, charts, and any other material on this site, is intended for informational purposes only and does not take the place of medical guidance provided by your physician. No information on this site is intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Please consult a qualified medical professional about your condition or circumstances before undertaking a new healthcare regimen.

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