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  1. The #1 Common Flu Misconception

    True or False.  Cold weather makes you sick? If you were like me and said true, then you’re in the same boat as the majority of the population. This misconception has been repeated for so long that we all start to believe it is true. The magnificent thing about science is the ability to challenge and prove theories. So how come more people get sick in the winter than in the summer? It comes down to the simple fact that people are inside together for longer periods of time1. With the days getting shorter and people staying inside for longer periods of time person to person contact increases.  The heightened contact of sick people talking, coughing, and sneezing are the top causes of cold and flu transmission 2.

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  2. Can intermittent catheter increase the risk of bladder cancer?

    Can intermittent catheter increase the risk of bladder cancer?

    In the spinal cord injury (SCI) population bladder cancer incidence is around 3% versus the less than 1% in the general population.  Although bladder cancer typically is 100 times more likely in SCI individuals, it is still rather uncommon.  Survivors of spinal cord injury have more concerns with complications of pressure sores, kidney failure and spinal cord cysts.  The risk of bladder cancer increases with the use of a “foley” or “indwelling” catheter or even a suprapubic catheter.  The main culprit for bladder cancer is bladder irritation.  Recurrent or frequent urinary tract infections (UTIs) or bladder infections, repeat bladder stones, and irritation resulting from catheters are known bladder irritants.  Consult your doctor about your risk of developing bladder cancer if you use catheters especially foley or suprapubic.  Your urologist can inspect your bladder, which is recommended around 5 years after your SCI. 1,2

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  3. The Magic behind the Magic Bullet

    The Magic behind the Magic Bullet

    One of the top selling items on AllegroMedical.com is the Magic Bullet Suppository. Many similar products out on the market are oil based, but the Magic Bullet is a water soluble bisacodyl made from Polyethylene Glycol. This seemingly minor yet important change in the product makeup has a significant impact on bowel stimulation.  Anyone who has ever had to use laxatives, especially those with spinal cord injuries (SPI), knows that time is of the essence.

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  4. Experimental Drug Helps Mice With Spinal Cord Injuries

    Millions of people around the world suffer from severe spinal cord injuries that result in permanent loss of control of their arms or legs, or loss of bladder, bowel or sexual functions. Now, US researchers have developed an oral medication that offers hope that some of these lost functions could be regained. When given to laboratory mice shortly after a spinal cord injury, the drug restored the animals' mobility.

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  5. Bionic suit offers spinal cord injury patients help walking

    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- A new bionic suit is helping paralyzed patients walk. It's the first time this technology has been available in Southern California. It's giving one man the use of his legs again.

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  6. Wheelchair curling builds strength, independence for those with spinal cord injury

    A group of curlers were taking part in a game of wheelchair curling on Saturday. It was a fundraiser for First Steps Wellness Centre, a rehab clinic that works with people who have spinal cord injuries. It was also a fun way for people in wheelchairs to build their strength and independence.

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  7. Discovery may help nerve regeneration in spinal injury

    Scientists at the Universities of Liverpool and Glasgow have uncovered a possible new method of enhancing nerve repair in the treatment of spinal cord injuries.
    It is known that scar tissue, which forms following spinal cord injury, creates an impenetrable barrier to nerve regeneration, leading to the irreversible paralysis associated with spinal injuries. Scientists at Liverpool and Glasgow have discovered that long-chain sugars, called heparan sulfates, play a significant role in the process of scar formation in cell models in the laboratory. Research findings have the potential to contribute to new strategies for manipulating the scarring process induced in spinal cord injury and improving the effectiveness of cell transplantation therapies in patients with this type of injury.
    Click HERE to read the whole story at MedicalExpress.com

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  8. Best Wipes for All-Over Skin Care

    Prevail Disposable Washcloths Face it, we live in a world of disposables.  And I say 'hooray' for those use-and-toss wipes that help us stay healthy, clean and sanitary.  Anything  pre-treated or pre-moistened with protection, moisture, anti-bacterials, that gets the job done fast is worth its weight in gold.

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